A Culturally Targeted Self-Management Program for African Americans With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Janice Collins-McNeil, Christopher L. Edwards, Bryan C. Batch, Debra Benbow, Camela S. McDougald, Daphne Sharpe

Abstract


Inadequate knowledge of the influence of lifestyle on clinical outcomes contributes to the difficulties many African Americans experience with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This pilot study examined a 12-week church-based culturally targeted diabetes self-management education (DSME) intervention for middle-aged and older African Americans with T2DM. Quantitative data were collected at baseline and at 12 weeks and included questionnaires and anthropometric measures. There were significant increases in medication adherence (p = .006), healthy eating (p = .009), and foot care adherence (p = .003). The intervention had a clinically significant effect on systolic blood pressure, blood lipids, physical activity, and waist circumference. Church-based culturally targeted DSME interventions may result in improved outcomes for African-American adults with T2DM. The authors discuss the value of community-based interventions that target behavioural changes in populations of chronically ill patients, particularly those who historically have been disenfranchised and/or underserved.

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